My kiddos have two travel toiletry kits: one for standard toiletries (toothbrushes, soaps, shampoos, etc.), and one for meds (ibuprofen, Essie's prescription eczema creams and diaper-rash creams, etc.).

My kiddos have two travel toiletry kits: one for standard toiletries (toothbrushes, soaps, shampoos, etc.), and one for meds (ibuprofen, Essie’s prescription eczema creams and diaper-rash creams, etc.).

You probably have your own toiletry kit that you keep packed for travel (if not, I strongly recommend one that hangs, so you can hang it up high, out of kiddos’ reach) – but do you also have a separate one for your littlest travelers? Keeping one packed, and reviewing its contents before each trip, is loads easier than starting from scratch each time.

My kids' basic travel toiletry kit is a tiny hanging one from Samsonite.  Even though it's small, its various pockets and elastic straps hold tons of stuff, from their various shampoos and soaps to hair accessories, nail files and clippers, and a Neutrogena sunscreen stick.

My kids’ basic travel toiletry kit is a tiny hanging one from Samsonite. Even though it’s small, its various pockets and elastic straps hold tons of stuff, from their various shampoos and soaps to hair accessories, nail files and clippers, and a Neutrogena sunscreen stick.

Depending on the nature of your kids and the trip, you may want to break your kiddos’ toiletry kit up into two smaller containers: one you can pack in your luggage (the lotion, baby shampoo, nail clipper, etc.), and one to keep handy while in the car or on the plane. This second one will have your thermometer/probe covers, any prescription meds your child takes, several medicine syringes or medicine cups, a snack-sized ziptop bag to put dirties in until you can wash them, and small bottles of whatever else your child might need. For us, that’s a travel-sized container of concentrated acetaminophen or ibuprofen drops, a small bottle of diphenhydramine for allergies, and sample-sized tubes of Essie’s prescription-strength eczema creams from her doctor. When we were traveling with an infant, the contents also included teething gel, a small bottle of saline drops and bulb syringe, bottles of prescription medicine for thrush and reflux, and Vitamin D drops.

I keep everything my kiddos might need for most medical emergencies - from a thermometer (with plenty of probe covers!) to Essie's various prescription skin lotions and diaper-rash creams - in a separate container from their other toiletries.  This way, it's easier to stuff into my purse for road trips, or a carry-on for plane travel.  More than once, I've been glad to have easy access to it while in the car or waiting in an airport.

I keep everything my kiddos might need for most medical emergencies – from a thermometer (with plenty of probe covers!) to Essie’s various prescription skin lotions and diaper-rash creams – in a separate container from their other toiletries. This way, it’s easier to stuff into my purse for road trips, or a carry-on for plane travel. More than once, I’ve been glad to have easy access to it while in the car or waiting in an airport.

If your child uses anything out of the ordinary on a doctor’s recommendation, such as a special lotion, shampoo, diaper cream, or body wash, ask your child’s doctor for sample-sized containers before your trip. Consider also asking for current paper copies of any regular prescriptions to take with you, in case the journey triggers an episode of that recurrent allergic reaction or infection or what-have-you. In Essie’s case, switching from cloth diapers to disposables for travel almost always generates a yeast infection, staph infection, or both in her diaper area. If I forget to pack the appropriate prescription creams to treat these conditions, you better believe I’m gonna need to call our pediatrician and have a copy sent to wherever we are.

Little Remedies sells a nice set of sample sizes of their products (one of my favorite things to give new parents at a baby shower), which is a good starting point for little containers of baby meds that are travel-ready.

So if you anticipate traveling over the holidays to visit far-away relatives, now’s a good time to pack up a travel toiletry kit for your little one(s), and perhaps a separate travel-sized collection of meds and first-aid items. A small investment of time now will pay off for years to come, in time saved before future family vacations.

 

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